Seal
Back To Home Page

See The Maps

Read The NEWS

The Pequonnock River Watershead

Read Our Minutes

See Our Conservationists

Visit Our Open Space

The Land Trust

Rails To Trails

Our Endangered Species

The Commission is dedicated to enriching the quality of life in Monroe by protecting the community's outdoor assets and water resources.



Commission Members

Chairman
Karen Burnaska

Vice Chairman
Marven Moss

Secretary
Ellie Krevolin

Treasurer
Ryan Driscoll

Members
Cynthia Giancaspro
Jeff Fulchino
Barbara Thomas

Liaisons
Ranger Dave Solek


Endangered, Threatened and Special Concern Species in Monroe

rails to trails

The Department of Environemntal Protection
,the DEP conducts a variety of research and management programs to protect and restore endangered, threatened and special concern species in Connecticut and serves as the primary source of information on the status of rare plant and animal species throughout the state.

Information on state and federal listed species and natural communities is compiled and made available through the Department's Natural Diversity Data Base (NDDB).

REPORT AN ENVIROMENTAL CONCERN OR PROBLEM

Species of the month

Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene c. carolina)
Eastern Range Eastern Box Turtle

Eastern Box turtles are a Connecticut "Special Concern" species, they are extremely long lived, slow to mature, and have relatively few offspring per year. These characteristics, along with a propensity to get hit by cars, make the box turtle a species particularly susceptible to human-induced problems. Deciduous woodland and overgrown old fields where turtles have ample cover and sunlight are favored habatat. This is a long-lived species and animals over 100 years old have been reported. Box turtles take well over a decade to reach maturity and have low egg outputs. Therefore, the increase in adult mortality is a critical issue affecting sustainability of turtle population.Connecticut law limits possession of box turtles to a single animal (Conn. Code Sec. 26-55-3-D), however box turtles cannot be collected from the wild within Connecticut (Conn. Code Sec. 26-66-14-A).

"Endangered Species" means any native species documented by biological research and inventory to be in danger of extirpation throughout all or a significant portion of its range within the state and to have no more than five occurrences in the state, and any species determined to be an "endangered species" pursuant to the federal Endangered Species Act.

"Threatened Species" means any native species documented by biological research and inventory to be likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range within the sate and to have no more than nine occurrences in the state, and any species determined to be a "threatened species" pursuant to the federal Endangered Species Act, except for such species determined to be endangered by the Commissioner in accordance with section 4 of this act.

"Species of Special Concern" means any native plant species or any native nonharvested wildlife species documented by scientific research and inventory to have a naturally restricted range or habitat in the state, to be at a low population level, to be in such high demand by man that its unregulated taking would be detrimental to the conservation of its population or has been extirpated from the state.

Connecticut General Statutes (CGS) Section 26-303